Monthly Archives: June 2013

The Gallery Is Up!

Thanks to the hard work of our webmaster and Lt. Lang the gallery section of the Wulff’s Company website has finally been updated. 8 new sections of photos from 2012 and 2013 have been uploaded for your viewing.

Best regards, Captain Wulff

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First Shots With The Ken Netting Hudson Valley Fowler

I hadn’t had the chance to get out and shoot my new Netting Fowler yet, but that changed today. 80 gr. charge in a paper cartridge with the same charge of #6 bird shot at 30 yards.

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Good pattern, but I shot a bit low. I wasn’t quite sure where to line up the front sight with the groove filed in the breech tang. The next three shots were done at 40yards, again, 80gr. charge in a paper cartridge with a .575 round ball inside. The pan was charged from the cartridge on all shots.

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The two shots in the center diamond are mine. The trigger pull on the Fowler is very light, and I think I was pulling right a bit not being used to it. The shot in the upper right corner was made by my wife Beth. Damn good shot for a gal holding up 9lbs. of gun and a 54 inch barrel! Cleaning this beast was a learning experience, but I think I have a system worked out. The long barrel dictates the need to plug the touch hole when I normally can just reach down and plug it with my hand.

Best regards, Captain Wulff

 

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Muster On The Maumee

Beth and I drove up to Fort Meigs today to walk around a bit. They were holding their annual timeline event, Muster on the Maumee. You can see everything from a medieval knight in full armor to a Vietnam soldier at this event. We met up with Lt. Lang while there. It is a shame but this event, like many others, is suffering from a lack of participants. It was about half the size of normal years. This is a trend I see more and more, maybe we are all getting too old, and I don’t see many younger re-enactors taking our place!

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It did give me a chance to take the new fowler out for a walk, and I was able to get her fitted with a flash guard  before her first big event, Niagara!

Best regards, Captain Wulff

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Father’s Day Fowler

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My dear wife has allowed me to purchase a fine fowling piece for Father’s Day. It is a Ken Netting Hudson Valley Fowler, stocked in Cherry and mounted in brass. The round 54 inch long barrel, made by Ken, is 20 gauge. The stock is extensively carved and the butt plate, side plate, and lock are all hand engraved. Ken made all of the mounts except the trigger guard, which is a copy of an original.

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The Chamber’s early Kentland lock has been extensively modified to resemble the banana shaped locks found on many early original Hudson Valley Fowlers. If I have not said it before, I am a very lucky man!

Best regards, Captain Wulff

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Cook’s Forest F&I Event

Here are some photos from the French and Indian War event held at Cook’s Forest, Pennsylvania.

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A little too quiet!

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The First Sergeant loads just in case.

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Action!

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Things are getting interesting!

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The heat of the battle!

Best regards, Captain Wulff

 

 

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Braddock’s Road Belt Axe

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This is the belt axe I purchased from Hoffman Reproductions. The axe head is a copy of an original found along the route of Braddock’s road from the French and Indian War. The basic shape and size matches that of many originals found at colonial sites throughout the original colonies. The small leather blade cover was made for my Virginia axe by Bruce Roberts, but it fit this axe perfectly! The maple handle is stained dark, and really compliments the walnut stock on my Ken Netting Fowler. What a team!

Best regards, Captain Wulff

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New Knife and Sheath

While at the Colonel Crawford event I picked up a new knife from Ben Hoffman of Hoffman Reproductions. Ben is a very talented up and coming bladesmith/craftsman from Ohio. He is very meticulous about his work right down to using period correct recipes for his stains and dyes. His knives, axes, and hawks are razor sharp! This man knows how to put an edge on a tool, and how to build one that keeps it!

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I fell in love with that bird’s head grip the moment I saw it, and it fit my hand “just right.” I normally don’t do much leather work because of some arthritis in my elbows, and the new knife came with a sheath, but it only covered the blade, and I like mine to fit over a portion of the handle so it is harder for the knife to pop out of the sheath while running the woods, while still letting it glide out easily when you need it. No sense in losing a $250.00 knife out in the woods, that could ruin a guy’s day! Anyway, sore hands or not I sat down and worked up a sheath, not too bad for my first real attempt.

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The handle fits snugly in the sheath.

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Rear view showing belt loop.

Best regards, Captain Wulff

 

 

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Colonel Crawford’s Defeat and Capture

Beth and I travelled today to a small park in Leesville, Ohio, and participated in the re-enactment of the defeat of Colonel Crawford’s small army sent into the Ohio Territory to wage war against the native tribes who had been raiding the frontier settlements in Pennsylvania and Virginia. We seldom get to do an event like this that concentrates on a very important, but often overlooked, part of Ohio’s history. Lou Tommelleo, corporal of Wulff’s Company, is one of the spearheads of the event. I hope you enjoy these few photos of the battle.

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The native warriors prepare to spring an ambush on Colonel Crawford’s small army which was primarily made up of frontier militiamen.

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Taking fire from the enemy!

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And returning it!

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The day would not be ours. Colonel Crawford’s command suffered a total defeat. The native warrior’s prepare to plunder and scalp the dead, including my lifeless body propped up against a tree where I fell.

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Colonel Crawford was captured and is being lead away by his native captors. He would endure four hours of torture too intense to even describe including being burned at the stake before death finally took him.

Best regards, Captain Wulff

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